Welcome Home!

Today we had some new arrivals on the farmy. About 300-400 of them. And thus far they seem to be content in their new location.

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The new arrivals are, of course, honeybees. I have been heavily considering a hive for a long time. My MIL and Greg purchased one for me this year for Christmas and yesterday I finally got to go pick up my bees, a 3 frame nucleus.

Now, the problem with that is the frames for a standard hive (known as a Langstroth) don’t fit into my stacking top bar hive (called a Warre). Langstroth hives were sized to be the largest commercially accessible boxes bees would fill with straight combs. They were cheap and production focused hives. Warre hives were designed to the sizes that bees preferred to make their combs given a variety of options. As such they are smaller and the Langstroth frames don’t fit.

So we ended up following some instructions on a Youtube video online. We used cheap dollar-store clamp style hair clips like these;

35

Very 90’s!

And then tied them onto the top bars through the holes using twine. (The video suggested using zip ties but I didn’t have any.) Then we cut part of the frame out , just enough to fill a frame in the top bar hive, and used the hair clips to clamp onto them and hang them in the hive.

The bees seem happy enough on them, and they seem secure. As the bees work, they will seal the comb, hairclip and all, to the top bar until it’s secure. Then we can go back, snip the twine and cut the hairclip free. The bees will fill up the new gaps and it’ll be good as new.

The whole process was a little overwhelming for me. I have a somewhat irrational fear of bees. Getting stung doesn’t bother me that much, but the buzzing around my head or limbs, the potential for them to crawl up my clothes, etc. incites a panic in me. It’s not the pain, it’s all the anxiety leading up to the pain that causes my fear (which in turn fuels itself).

But I still managed to push forward and (three stings later) my friend (a semi-experienced beekeeper) and I got all the bees into the box. I did most of the installation and actual handling of the bees myself.

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Me on the right, brushing the bees into their new home while my friend holds the nuc box.

We did the whole process except closing up the hive at the end without a smoker, only sugar water. The only stings were my own. They did NOT like me taking away the frames to cut them for the new hive, and I got a sting for each of the frames I cut into for my troubles.

Today, they seem comfortable in their new home and have been working hard to clean out the mess of the cut combs. The honey stores left in the comb edges were cut open and set next to the hives for the bees to finish eating at their leisure, and a feeder with 1:1 (by weight) sugar water was hung for them.

This is to give them plenty of nutrients and food while they repair their hive and wait for the fall nectar flow. We’ll get no honey from them this year. This year they need to build their hive, draw out comb,  and grow into a stronger unit. Next year we may be able to take the excess but for this year they will need the food to help them get through the winter.

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And this is where they now live. Happy as a clam. A clam filled with hundreds of stinging death monsters. But it’s not so bad. They seem to like it here. And that’s good.

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One thought on “Welcome Home!

  1. This is our 2nd year raising bees. You get used to them crawling on you EXCEPT when they somehow manage to get inside your suit. Not use to that yet! Best of luck – it is extremely fun!

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